Associate Director of Environmental Health and Safety

Posted: Apr 10, 2018

The primary purpose of the Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) office is to administer an institution-wide program to establish and maintain a safe and healthy working, learning and living environment for faculty, staff, and students. This is accomplished by EHS through the identification and correction of unsafe conditions, maintenance of an occupational health program, safety training, accident prevention, regulatory control, the providing of consultative services to management on environmental, health and safety matters, and the administration of the Workers’ Compensation program. This unit identifies and interprets federal, state, and local safety and health regulations and codes and assists the university community with their application.

Primary Purpose of Position

The primary purpose of this position is to serve in a leadership role assisting the Director in planning, developing, and administering a comprehensive environmental health and safety program with a high level of diversity, scope, dynamics and complexity involving multiple health and safety compliance issues.

Summary of Position Responsibilities

The position will provide expert advice to support university goals with due consideration of occupational regulations, laws and best practices. Additionally, the position will establish strategic performance improvement standards, manage emerging issues, develop safety management techniques, lead projects, manage daily operations, supervise staff, build partnerships, promote a proactive safety culture, and maintain regulatory compliance. The comprehensive environmental health and safety program covers areas of the university including occupational health and safety, laboratory safety, fire and life safety, workers’ compensation, training and support services. This position supervises work that is characterized by a high degree of complexity with numerous technical standards and a significant number of variables.

Minimum Education/Experience

Master’s degree and seven to ten years experience in an environmental health and safety role, with 2 years of supervisory experience. Strong organizational, conflict resolution and problem-solving skills. Exceptional oral and written communication skills. Expert knowledge of Occupational Health and Safety Administration, environmental, North Carolina Fire Prevention, and North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services compliance. Ability to motivate and inspire team members. Ability to build relationships and promote a proactive safety culture. Ability to consistently exercise good judgment and make complex decisions on a daily basis.

Preferred Education, Knowledge, Skills and Experience

Ten plus years of professional experience with at least 3 years of supervisory experience. Higher education or public sector industry experience desirable. Practical knowledge and application of environmental health and safety regulations at a higher education institution. Demonstrated organizational leadership experience. Experience building an environmental health and safety program especially using technology to automate processes. Self-motivated, energetic and enthusiastic with a willingness to engage in all team functions.

Necessary Certifications/Licenses Preferred Certifications/Licenses

Certified Safety Professional (CSP), Associate Risk Management (ARM), Certified Industrial Hygienist (CIH), or other relevant certification.

Special Notes to Applicants

Please submit a resume and cover letter with your application. *These documents will be used to evaluate your written communication skills as well as supporting documents of your knowledge, skills, abilities, education and professional experience. Please ensure your full range of knowledge, skills, abilities, experience and education are listed on your application. Do not write ‘see resume’ on your application when completing the job duties section. The finalist will be subject to a criminal background check.

Apply Online

https://jobs.uncc.edu/postings/21143